How to cure adrenal fatigue.
 
By Mark Rosenberg, M.D.


No one knows your body better than you do. Occasionally, I will treat a patient who is experiencing a variety of symptoms without an obvious cause. Unfortunately, some doctors tell patients it is "all in their heads" when test results fail to reveal a specific problem. This is often the case in people who suffer from adrenal exhaustion. Traditional tests may not detect small changes in hormone levels, yet symptoms persist. I will explain how to recognize adrenal exhaustion and provide some solutions for living with this condition.

What Causes Adrenal Exhaustion?

The adrenals are two small glands near the kidneys. They produce a variety of hormones, like cortisol, adrenaline and DHEA, which help you cope with day-to-day events. Most of you will be familiar with adrenaline, also known as the "fight or flight" hormone. Adrenaline prepares your body to respond to stressful situations by either solving problems on the spot or quickly removing you from danger. For example, you see a small child about to step in front of a car. A rush of adrenaline gives your body the speed and agility to quickly whisk the child out of harm's way.

We all tap into our body's supply of adrenaline from time to time. Certain people, however, may be under so much stress that they burn through adrenaline faster than it can be replenished. When adrenaline levels are depleted, other hormones must adapt, and soon the whole system is topsy turvy. Stress that depletes adrenaline is often chronic, perhaps due to your job, an unmanageable schedule or constant anxiety. For many women, the hormonal changes accompanying pre-menopause can trigger adrenal exhaustion.

Symptoms of adrenal exhaustion are often confused with other conditions, such as depression, chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia. In fact, common symptoms include feeling tired and feeling depressed. Other symptoms reported by patients are sleep disturbances, body aches and digestive problems. If your doctor rules out other specific conditions, such as the ones mentioned above, you may be suffering from adrenal exhaustion.

How to Cope

It is possible to restore balance to your adrenal glands through natural lifestyle changes. You must address the issue from every angle.

First, you may need to make some big changes to manage stress. Most patients can pinpoint their source of stress, and this is the first step to health. Change your routine, look for a new job, practice stress-reduction techniques, or stop spending time with people who sap your positive energy. Equally important to reducing external stressors is reducing the stress you put upon yourself internally. Banishing negative thoughts and replacing them with a positive mantra is one smart strategy. Many people find that counseling helps them change their attitude and put a stop to negative self talk.

Dietary changes can make an impact on your body's hormonal balance. Strive to eat natural, unprocessed foods. Eliminate added sugar and reduce your intake of white carbohydrates as much as possible. Instead, include protein in every meal and eat plenty of fruit and vegetables. Caffeine can wreak havoc on your adrenal glands, so you might consider weaning yourself off of coffee and tea. Drink decaf and rely on 7 to 8 hours of sleep to keep energy levels up. Regular, moderate exercise is another proven way to maintain energy. It also improves your mood and motivates you to eat healthfully.

Vitamin supplements are important for nutritional support, as well. A multiple vitamin is good for starters. Look for high-quality brands that contain plenty of vitamin C, B vitamins, zinc and magnesium. That's why I recommend taking a daily multi-vitamin to every one of my patients.

Some herbs can support healthy hormone levels, too. Licorice root extract may mimic the effects of cortisol. Start with a quarter teaspoon each day and slowly work up to three times a day. If you have high blood pressure, you should not take this herb. Siberian ginseng may contain a precursor to the hormone, DHEA. Take 100 mg twice a day before 3 P.M. so that it does not interfere with sleep.

Adrenal exhaustion can be frustrating, especially when doctors are uncertain about the proper diagnosis. See a specialist in hormone therapy or an endocrinologist. Most importantly, listen to your body. You have the power to make changes that will positively impact your health.


Mark Rosenberg, M.D
Institute For Healthy Aging

http://www.vitalmaxvitamins.com 
http://www.vitalmaxvitamins.com/blog

Article Source: 
http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Mark_Rosenberg,_M.D.
 
 
By Mark Rosenberg, M.D.


No one knows your body better than you do. Occasionally, I will treat a patient who is experiencing a variety of symptoms without an obvious cause. Unfortunately, some doctors tell patients it is "all in their heads" when test results fail to reveal a specific problem. This is often the case in people who suffer from adrenal exhaustion. Traditional tests may not detect small changes in hormone levels, yet symptoms persist. I will explain how to recognize adrenal exhaustion and provide some solutions for living with this condition.

What Causes Adrenal Exhaustion?

The adrenals are two small glands near the kidneys. They produce a variety of hormones, like cortisol, adrenaline and DHEA, which help you cope with day-to-day events. Most of you will be familiar with adrenaline, also known as the "fight or flight" hormone. Adrenaline prepares your body to respond to stressful situations by either solving problems on the spot or quickly removing you from danger. For example, you see a small child about to step in front of a car. A rush of adrenaline gives your body the speed and agility to quickly whisk the child out of harm's way.

We all tap into our body's supply of adrenaline from time to time. Certain people, however, may be under so much stress that they burn through adrenaline faster than it can be replenished. When adrenaline levels are depleted, other hormones must adapt, and soon the whole system is topsy turvy. Stress that depletes adrenaline is often chronic, perhaps due to your job, an unmanageable schedule or constant anxiety. For many women, the hormonal changes accompanying pre-menopause can trigger adrenal exhaustion.

Symptoms of adrenal exhaustion are often confused with other conditions, such as depression, chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia. In fact, common symptoms include feeling tired and feeling depressed. Other symptoms reported by patients are sleep disturbances, body aches and digestive problems. If your doctor rules out other specific conditions, such as the ones mentioned above, you may be suffering from adrenal exhaustion.

How to Cope

It is possible to restore balance to your adrenal glands through natural lifestyle changes. You must address the issue from every angle.

First, you may need to make some big changes to manage stress. Most patients can pinpoint their source of stress, and this is the first step to health. Change your routine, look for a new job, practice stress-reduction techniques, or stop spending time with people who sap your positive energy. Equally important to reducing external stressors is reducing the stress you put upon yourself internally. Banishing negative thoughts and replacing them with a positive mantra is one smart strategy. Many people find that counseling helps them change their attitude and put a stop to negative self talk.

Dietary changes can make an impact on your body's hormonal balance. Strive to eat natural, unprocessed foods. Eliminate added sugar and reduce your intake of white carbohydrates as much as possible. Instead, include protein in every meal and eat plenty of fruit and vegetables. Caffeine can wreak havoc on your adrenal glands, so you might consider weaning yourself off of coffee and tea. Drink decaf and rely on 7 to 8 hours of sleep to keep energy levels up. Regular, moderate exercise is another proven way to maintain energy. It also improves your mood and motivates you to eat healthfully.

Vitamin supplements are important for nutritional support, as well. A multiple vitamin is good for starters. Look for high-quality brands that contain plenty of vitamin C, B vitamins, zinc and magnesium. That's why I recommend taking a daily multi-vitamin to every one of my patients.

Some herbs can support healthy hormone levels, too. Licorice root extract may mimic the effects of cortisol. Start with a quarter teaspoon each day and slowly work up to three times a day. If you have high blood pressure, you should not take this herb. Siberian ginseng may contain a precursor to the hormone, DHEA. Take 100 mg twice a day before 3 P.M. so that it does not interfere with sleep.

Adrenal exhaustion can be frustrating, especially when doctors are uncertain about the proper diagnosis. See a specialist in hormone therapy or an endocrinologist. Most importantly, listen to your body. You have the power to make changes that will positively impact your health.


Mark Rosenberg, M.D
Institute For Healthy Aging

http://www.vitalmaxvitamins.com 
http://www.vitalmaxvitamins.com/blog

Article Source: 
http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Mark_Rosenberg,_M.D.
 
 
By Elizabeth Noble


Mono is a common trigger for adrenal exhaustion. During mononucleosis treatment it is vital that the adrenal glands are considered as part of the plan.

After an illness like the Epstein Barr virus that causes mononucleosis or glandular fever, the body needs time to recover. Plenty of sleep, rest, pure healthy food, sunshine and graded exercise are essential. If these conditions are not met, then the adrenal glands become fatigued or "exhausted". They are then unable to produce adequate amounts of hormones like adrenaline, cortisol and DHEA. The job of these adrenal hormones is to help the body cope with stress.

So what are the symptoms of exhausted adrenals? Well the primary symptom is low energy, lethargy and ongoing fatigue. You may also notice dark circles under your eyes, lowered immunity, a poor sex drive, premenstrual tension, sugar cravings, headaches, poor concentration, unrefreshing sleep and a general loss of interest in life.

If you are looking into mononucleosis treatments, then here are some tips on how to treat adrenal exhaustion and get you feeling better fast!



  • You should aim to get adequate sleep. At least 8-10 hours of deep, unbroken sleep a night is required. An afternoon nap can also be very beneficial, but don't leave it too late in the day.
  • Regular meditation, yoga or deep breathing can help your body cope with the stress of having mono and make you more resilient to whatever life throws at you.
  • Your diet should be low in sugar, white flour, coffee, alcohol, processed foods, smoking and drugs. These vices can make you feel better in the short term but they will drain your adrenals and prolong your recovery if consumed regularly.
  • Supplements like vitamin C, the B complex and magnesium, can help repair the adrenal glands and assist in mononucleosis treatment. The omega 3 fatty acids from deep sea fish oils or flaxseed oil can help with fatigue. If you are anemic then taking some iron is important.
  • Herbs like licorice and ginseng can boost adrenal function and help with mononucleosis treatment. These herbs can be taken as teas, capsules or liquid tinctures.
  • Gentle physical exercise will build up your adrenal strength and stamina. If you are not used to exercise, then please start slowly and build up gently over time. If you are in the early acute stages of mono, then please rest until your body is up to it. If you do too much too soon, you will end up back at square one.
  • Make time for laughter, fun and joy in your life. These are great ways to lower your stress levels when treating mononucleosis.
  • Be gentle on yourself - don't strive to always be perfect. You can reduce stress simply by learning to go with the flow.
  • Celebrate the achievements and victories in your life. During mononucleosis treatment it may only be little things like enjoying a 10 minute stroll, finishing a good book or cooking up a new healthy meal that you can celebrate - that's a good start!  Acknowledging your progress will help keep a positive attitude that helps you cope with stress and keeps your adrenals strong.



For more information on adrenal exhaustion and natural mononucleosis treatment then please refer to the e-book Nature's Amazing Mononucleosis Cures by qualified naturopath Elizabeth Noble. Elizabeth has recovered from chronic mono herself, and has treated thousands of patients through her clinics and support groups.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Elizabeth_Noble

 
 
By Stephanie H. Yeh

Believe it or not, a heightened awareness of nasty smells is one of the symptoms of adrenal fatigue. I discovered that little tidbit recently when I found out that I was suffering from adrenal exhaustion ... along with an estimated 80% of the American population. Now you might think it strange that a cowgirl like me might notice more icky smells, being surrounded as I am by horse poop, dirt, male goats, and cows, but I did notice. So it all made sense when I was told by my physician that I had fatigued my adrenal glands.

What is Adrenal Fatigue or Exhaustion?

So what is adrenal exhaustion? It's just what it sounds like: it is what happens when your adrenal glands get over-worked and under-nourished, so they become fatigued. Why are adrenal glands important? Well, these little pea-sized glands that sit atop the kidneys secrete hormones that allow us to deal with immediate and long-term stress. The adrenals secrete over 50 different hormones, including adrenaline, estrogen, progesterone, cortisol, and DHEA. You've probably heard of most of these hormones. These hormones are what give us the ability to "get up and go," providing the energy we need to deal with our hectic and over stimulated lives.

Adrenal Fatigue Symptoms

Unfortunately, these glands, when over-stressed, eventually stop working, and then we end up with adrenal exhaustion or fatigue symptoms, which include:

- chronic fatigue and tiredness

- depression

- inability to think clearly

- chronic anxiety

- low blood sugar

- decreased metabolism

- changes in skin color

- craving for sweet or salty foods

- joint pain

- decreased immune function

- low body temperature

- allergies and food sensitivities

- dark circles under the eyes

There are other symptoms of adrenal overwork that could be added to the list, but you get the general idea. Our adrenal glands do a lot for our bodies and when we overuse them, they burnout.

Causes of Adrenal Fatigue

In general, our modern lifestyle is a recipe for adrenal exhaustion and burnout. Our adrenal glands suffer when we demand too much of them. Our minds are active and full of ideas, but our bodies can't keep up. Specifically, lifestyle habits that overstress the adrenals include:

- too little sleep

- poor diet

- use of caffeine or other stimulants

- use of medication to get to sleep at night

- use of medication to treat anxiety or depression

- perfectionism

- constant physical, mental, or emotional stress

- over stimulation from cell phones, music, traffic, pagers, and email

You get the picture ... it's nothing out of the ordinary in our modern lives. For most people, it's just a snapshot of everyday life. But it's hell on the adrenal glands. In fact, modern life has such a strong negative effect on the adrenals that some women suffering from adrenal fatigue are showing signs of menopause as early as their mid-30s. Yikes! You read it right: adrenal burnout can cause early aging.

Adrenal Fatigue Treatment

Luckily, treatment is possible for this condition. The treatments fall into three basic categories:

1) Herbal and nutritional support (I like XanGo's X51/Eleviv, other people like straight herbs)

2) Lifestyle changes

3) Reenergizing practices

This article is the first in a series on regaining health after adrenal fatigue, and future articles will cover specific strategies for doing so. The prognosis for coming out of adrenal fatigue is generally quite positive, and many physicians offer the following time frame for recovery:

- 6 to 9 months for minor fatigue

- 12 to 18 months for moderate fatigue

- Up to 24 months for severe fatigue

As you can see, the road back to energetic and vital health isn't a short one ... but then again, most people don't achieve adrenal fatigue overnight either! Stay tuned for more articles on adrenal fatigue treatment, or browse the Zen Cowgirl blog to read more.

Stephanie Yeh is a zen cowgirl obsessed about horses, healing, natural remedies, herbs, magic, MLM, and more. Check out natural horse care tips, ways to fund your horse obsession, natural health products, and more on her blog (http://zencowgirl.blogspot.com) and order XanGo mangosteen products (including Eleviv/X51) on her website http://www.mangosteengood.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Stephanie_H._Yeh
 

How to Treat Adrenal Fatigue.